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Friday, September 30, 2016

Marriott buys Starwood, becoming world's largest hotel chain

Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront


Starwood, Marriott, Coutyard, Riz Carlton, Sheration, Westin, St Regis, Hilton, Hyatt...Will we notice a difference if they all come under the same hotel company? Could the individual brand be lost? Watch the video then read the article.

http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000553569

Several of the best-known names in travel are now united in one hotel company.


Marriott International closed Friday morning on its $13 billion acquisition of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, bringing together its Marriott, Courtyard and Ritz Carlton brands with Starwood's Sheraton, Westin, W and St. Regis properties.
In total, 30 hotel brands now fall under the Marriott umbrella to create the largest hotel chain in the world with more than 5,800 properties and 1.1 million rooms in more than 110 countries. That's more than 1 out of every 15 hotel rooms around the globe.
Marriott now eclipses Hilton Worldwide's 773,000 rooms and the 766,000 that are part of the Intercontinental Hotels Group family, according to STR, a firm that tracks hotel data.
"We've got an ability to offer just that much more choice. A choice in locations, a choice in the kind of hotel, a choice in the amount a customer needs to spend," Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson told The Associated Press in an interview Thursday.  
Marriott and Starwood — like other hotel chains — own very few individual hotels. Instead they manage or franchise their brands to hundreds of individual owners, often real estate development companies. Those individual hotel owners are responsible for setting nightly room rates. It isn't uncommon for a developer to own a Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt and Sheraton in the same city.
Read more:  http://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/23/marriott-buys-starwood-becoming-worlds-largest-hotel-chain.html

The team does hotels too! Contact me for more informaiton.

Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Thursday, September 29, 2016

City Closes Loophole On Demolition of Historic Properties


PORTLAND TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO - Preservationists helped negotiate a 120-day delay for the Ancient The Order of the United Workmen building at Southwest Second and Taylor earlier this year, but the building is still set to be demolished.
A step in the direction of preservation was taken on Aug. 31, 2016 when a 14-year-old loophole that allowed the demolition of buildings on the Historic Resource Inventory was closed by the Bureau of Development Services. New guidelines require a 120-day delay before demolition or building permits are issued for any of the 2,745 ranked buildings in the Inventory.

Many preservationists understand the need for growth, but are hopeful of more appreciation of local history by state and local government.

“We have to navigate a path of accommodating growth but without completely losing the character of this place and all of the things that make Portland Portland in the process,” Moretti says.

Once snooze-worthy topics — buildings and city code — are becoming increasingly popular as Portland makes changes big and small in the wake of gentrification and urban renewal.
But a small change in code back in 2002 forming a legal loophole has caused irreparable harm, says Meg Hanson, an activist who’s planning a class action lawsuit.
The harm? Demolition of historic buildings when they possibly should have been afforded a 120-day demolition delay period.
The Bureau of Development services finally closed the 14-year-old loophole on Aug. 31 in a service update, now requiring a 120-day delay before demolition or building permits are issued for any of the 2,745 ranked buildings on the Historic Resource Inventory.
The inventory, created in 1984, is used by the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission to evaluate applications for landmark designations.
Under city rules, a 120-day demolition delay was the only “protection” a building had by being being listed on the Historic Resource Inventory. But that became pointless when the loophole was created in 2002 enabling a property owner to delist and receive a demolition permit in the same day.
The inventory emerged from obscurity when high-profile buildings, such as the Hotel Albion and the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple, were yanked off the inventory and slated for demolition.
The increasing rate at which this scenario was happening caused alarm to members of the historic preservation community, who wondered where the delay time had gone.
The historic preservation advocacy group Restore Oregon had been urging the city to change its practices since 2013, even threatening to take the city to court over the removal of the Workmen Temple from the inventory.
The threat didn’t come to fruition; Restore Oregon Executive Director Peggy Moretti says the organization fares better working with the city than against it.
Sudden change and state law
Regardless of repeated requests from organizations and activists, the bureau maintains it decided to evaluate its practices and make changes to align with state law, ORS 197.772, after the Oregon Supreme Court ruling issued on Aug. 4 in the case of Lake Oswego Preservation Society vs. City of Lake Oswego, in which the owner of a property — the Carman House — was barred from removing its historical designation.
“Upon further review, we decided we needed to be more consistent,” with ORS 197.772, says Ross Caron, public information officer for the Bureau of Development Services.
Before the ruling, the city asserted it was not violating state law because listing on the Historic Resource Inventory, ranked or not, did not amount to an “official” historic designation.
Restore Oregon says the city was misinterpreting state law.
Meg Hanson and her group, Close the Loophole Coalition, believe the city was violating the law by not offering the 120-day delay protection, which is outlined in the state’s “Goal 5” rules, a set of goals for protection of natural resoures, historic areas and open spaces.

Hanson believes that the loophole may have been created intentionally when the city was under pressure by the city auditor to create a faster permit-issuing process.

Even though the city has decided to comply, Hanson says a lawsuit is just the next step — “a natural progression” after all that has happened.
Hanson, a local assistant architect and engineer, became invested and created Close the Loophole Coalition when a developer planned to demolish 3334 S.E. Belmont, a 127-year-old building that many rallied to preserve earlier this year.
She has done extensive research on what she believes is the illegal issuance of demolition permits since the loophole’s creation in 2002.
A look at the city’s previous code on HRI properties back in 1996 was clear: Ordinance said inventoried properties may be delisted at the end of the demolition delay period, which complied with Goal 5 rules at the time.
In June 2002, this code was removed, and another was added that stated a resource listed on the inventory would be removed if the owner sends a written request on the date the office receives it. Mention of the delay period was erased.
Hanson believes that the loophole may have been created intentionally when the city was under pressure by the city auditor to create a faster permit-issuing process.
Repercussions of such a goal, according to Hanson and other advocates, are demolitions of buildings that could have been considered for protections by The National Register of Historic Places, while contributing to the erasure of the city’s “character.”

Map

See a map of all Historic Resource Inventory properties on line at: portlandoregon.gov/bps/article/346583

Read the complete article:

http://pamplinmedia.com/but/239-news/324669-202733-city-closes-loophole-on-historic-properties

Interesting in investing in Portland? Please contact me:
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Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Fueled by a five-year property tax abatement, Grovtec Relocates to Wood Village

 OUTLOOK PHOTO: JOSH KULLA - GroveTec employs milling equipment that is up to 70 years old, while at the same time using advanced CNC machining gear such as that shown in the photo.

Wood Village does it again! No City can beat Wood Village's incentive programs and approval times!

Good Move: Relocation to Wood Village fuels Grovtec's expansion beyond firearms industry

Wood Village, state incentives keep company from leaving Oregon 

Grovtec celebrated its new location at 23555 N.E. Halsey St. (just north of the Best Western hotel) and the 10 years of growth that made it possible with an open house July 27, 2016

In these days of wide-open global commerce and outsourcing to overseas countries, running a company that manufactures and fabricates its products exclusively within the United States presents distinct hurdles to remaining competitive. 
No one knows this better than Bob Grover, president of Grovtec US Inc., a Portland-area manufacturer of parts and accessories for the firearms, medical and aerospace industries since 2006 
“It’s always a challenge to be the lowest-cost person,” he said. “We’re not the lowest cost in terms of all our products, but quality, deliverability, customer service and all the other areas — that’s where we really shine.” 
Last spring, Grovtec relocated its operation from Milwaukie to three buildings in Wood Village, expanding its square footage from 47,000 to 68,000 while adding 12 employees.
The company will celebrate its new location at 23555 N.E. Halsey St. (just north of the Best Western hotel) and the 10 years of growth that made it possible with an open house from 3-6 p.m. Wednesday, July 27. 
Grover, 49, a Gladstone resident who runs the sprawling Grovtec facility along with his wife, two sons and daughter-in-law, noted the company’s steady growth in the past decade is accelerating as it expands its mission beyond the firearms industry.
“We will have over 100 employees next year,” he said. “It’s been nice, steady growth — and not just in the shooting industry.” 
Grovtec employees work with an intriguing mixture of manual and automatic, ancient and cutting-edge technology on the company’s vast manufacturing floor to turn out all manner of goods and accessories. From leather gun holsters, slings and the “swivels” that attach them to gun stocks, medical and dental instruments and sporting goods to screws and fasteners used in airplane cockpits and chairs, Grovtec’s product line infiltrates practically all aspects of modern life. 
In addition to the need for considerably more space than the Milwaukie facility provided, Grovtec’s move across the eastside was fueled by a five-year property tax abatement through the city of Wood Village’s enterprise zone program, as well as a relocation-based loan and employee training grants through Business Oregon.
 Read the complete story at:
http://www.pamplinmedia.com/go/42-news/316330-195137-good-move-relocation-to-wood-village-fuels-grovtecs-expansion-beyond-firearms-industry

Interested in reclocating your company to Wood Village? Please contact me:
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Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Monday, September 26, 2016

Multi-million dollar retail development coming to 82nd Avenue

12.5 Acre site at 82nd and Siskiyou St, across from Madison High School
A new retail center will be quite the draw for Madison High students! My advice is to recruit plenty of fast food, junk food, cheap food and candy providers!

Plans for one of East Portland's largest undeveloped tracts

 12.5 Acres across form Madison High School 

A former landfill on Northeast 82nd Avenue could soon be a bustling retail center.
Portland developer Capstone Partners is under contract to buy the 12.5-acre tract, and hopes to finalize the sale next year, said Jeff Sackett, principal at Capstone.
The company plans to spend millions to redevelop the site, and hopes to attract local and national tenants, he said. 
The site, just south of 82nd and Siskiyou, across from Madison High School, is one of the largest undeveloped tracts in East Portland.
Mike Hashem, one of the tract's owners, said his partnership bought the land in 1987 for $1.7 million. Now, the land is worth about $3.6 million, according to Multnomah County. 
A landfill for construction debris occupied the site at one point, and a driving range operated on the site for a few years before it closed in 2001, Hashem said.
Since then, the land has sat empty, though a few small businesses operate on adjacent properties, and a Zen temple sits to the northeast. 
In 2009, the vacant lot was a stark reminder of the town's urban renewal failure. Two years earlier, a Canadian firm had proposed a big box shopping center on the site, but neighbors, fearing a Walmart, worked with future Mayor Sam Adams to kill the idea.
Now, Hashem doubts Walmart will be part of the development, which he said will be a retail center likely anchored by a local grocery store. 
"Walmart would have been just fine," he said. "The neighborhood needs some kind of development. You need a main anchor – say, Fred Meyer – to come in, and smaller retailers will follow." 
Hashem said he's excited to work with Capstone, the developer behind Northeast Broadway's swanky Grant Park Village and the high-priced apartments at Southeast 26th and Burnside. 
Capstone has its work cut out.
As a former landfill, the site comes with "lots of challenges," Capstone's Sackett said.
But Sackett is optimistic. 
"We have reason to believe it's a desirable location."
Capstone wouldn't buy it otherwise, he said.
-- Anna Marum
amarum@oregonian.com
503-294-5911
@annamarum
http://www.oregonlive.com/window-shop/index.ssf/2016/09/82nd_avenue_retail_development.html

Interesting in investing in East County? Please contact me:
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Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Saturday, September 24, 2016

30 Acre Zidell property deal to transform Portland's South Waterfront

A rendering of the proposed master plan for the Zidell family-owned property in Portland's South Waterfront.(Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects/ZRZ Realty Co.)
The South Waterfront has been going through an amazing transformation with gleaming towers rising above parklike settings, OHSU's new Dental School and the opening of the Tillikum Crossing Bridge. Now the redelopment of 30 acres owned by the Zidell family could bring more than 20 more towers, changing the skyline of Portland.

Portland approves 'make or break' South Waterfront deal with Zidell

Calling it the missing puzzle piece to a complete South Waterfront District, the Portland City Council unanimously approved a historic deal Wednesday to subsidize redevelopment of about 30 acres owned by the Zidell family with at least $23.8 million of public money for parks, roads and other improvements.
The PDC would spend about $4.6 million extending Bond Avenue, a key inland north-south route, plus three connections between Bond and Moody. The Portland Bureau of Transportation would also kick in $750,000 toward the effort.
The urban renewal agency also would spend $11.7 million to develop a park along the riverfront, called the South Waterfront Greenway. Additionally, $5 million of urban renewal funds would be used buy land for a city park underneath the Ross Island Bridge. Portland Parks & Recreation is also expected to contribute toward the eventual acquisition. Finally, $2.5 million would be spent on other efforts, such as putting power lines underground.

The deal outlines a multi-phase building boom that would grow the upstart district by 1.44 million square feet of office, residential and commercial space and add at least $210 million to the tax rolls.
"This development agreement is the make or break for the entire area," Commissioner Amanda Fritz said. "If we can get it right, it's going to be a wonderful community to live, work and play in for 100 years or more. If we don't, it'll be a, 'Huh, not quite what we thought.'"
The agreement marks Portland's most sweeping development deal with the private sector in more than a decade. Officials hope to replicate successes from earlier compacts with developers Homer Williams and Dike Dame, who resurrected the Pearl District and later led the high-rise condo craze that jump started the South Waterfront.
But the deal has not been without setbacks and delays, as efforts to secure property for low-rent affordable housing and parks threatened progress. But both sides now say they've reached a fair deal.
"It's had its ups and downs," said Jay Zidell, president of a family business slowly transitioning from barge building to real estate. "We'll all be able to sit around years from now and look back at the great things we've accomplished."
Zidell's acreage straddles the Ross Island Bridge and is the largest undeveloped canvass in the central city, but today it largely remains a no-man's land bookended by marquee projects.
The family's northern property is bounded by the new light-rail line set to open Sept. 12. The southern edge bumps against land held by the region's largest employer, Oregon Health & Science University, and the expensive condo towers that remade Portland's skyline in the mid-2000s.

Pam Martin | pmartin@oregonian.com
Build out of the Zidell property will begin with a first phase featuring at least 440,000 square feet over three projects along Southwest Moody Avenue – the only existing road.
Two of the projects – called Block 1 and Block 6 – must begin construction by no later than July 2017. The third project, Block 4, is expected to have a similar timeline but could begin construction as late as June 2025.
Combined, the three projects are expected to add at least $60 million in assessed value to the tax rolls.
Plans for the larger second phase exist only in broad-brush strokes.
Zidell wants to build at least 1 million square feet of office, commercial and residential space on property north of the Ross Island Bridge and east of the to-be-constructed Southwest Bond Avenue extension.
The first project would begin construction by July 2019 and construction on all phase-two projects would launch by June 2025. In all, the second phase would produce $150 million in tax-assessed value. Read more:
http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2015/06/portland_approves_make_or_brea.html

Interested in investing in our beautiful City? Please contact me:
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Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Friday, September 23, 2016

When it comes to apatment sales, Gresham gives Portland a run for it's money

Parkside Aptment Homes, 2831 SE Palmquist Rd, Gresham, Or
I guess we shouldn't be surprised that outer East County has finally been discovered! Who wouldn't want to invest in our pleasant area? DANGIT!

Rent growth throughout the Gresham market continues to match or outperform many areas of Portland

For investors, Portland apartments have become all the rage in recent years. Now, some of the metro region's submarkets are picking up steam as well. 

One in particular: Gresham, at least according to HFO Investment Real Estate, which recently brokered the $37.25 million sale of the Parkside Apartment Homes there. 
“Rent growth throughout the Gresham market continues to match or outperform many areas of Portland,” said HFO partner Tyler Johnson, in a release about the sale. “As vacancies drop and rents rise, large institutional investors are taking advantage of the value added investments available in the submarket.” 
National research firm REIS notes that vacancies in Gresham are at just 1 percent and rents are expected to grow no less than 8 percent in the coming year. That makes the market an attractive one for outside investors. 
In the case of the Parkside Apartment Homes, a 225-unit development on 8.5 acres near Gresham's Gradin Community Sports Park, interest came from investors across the country. BEF Holdings of Los Angeles ended up sealing the deal, buying the apartments from New York private equity firm KKR. 
Along with Johnson, HFO's Cody Hagerman represented KKR in the deal. The transaction comes in the wake of another big one for HFO: the $23.75 million sale of the Sienna Pointe apartments in Bend, which set a new per-unit price high mark.
http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/real-estate-daily/2016/08/when-it-comes-to-apartments-this-metro-region.html

If you too want to invest in this amazing area,  please contact me:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Evergreen Space Museum, Waterpark Sold for $10.9 Million

Evergreen Space Museum© 2013 Coffman Excavation All rights reserved • Excavation/Heavy Civil/Site Preparation Contractor • Portland, OR •

New buyers, Falls Event Center,  plan an exciting future for the 6 building, 40 acre campus! Purchased on August 19th, 2016, the Space Museum and water park will remain open. A great relief for the visitors who have enjoyed visits to the Spruce Goose!

Buyer plans new hotel and wants to turn McMinnville campus into top tourist destination in Oregon

McMINNVILLE -- Jeopardized properties on the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum campus appear to be safe after a sale has been completed that satisfies the property owner’s bankruptcy filed early this year.
On Aug. 19, the Falls Event Center completed its purchase of several parcels and additional assets on the Evergreen campus.
The $10.9 million sale transfers the Wings & Waves Waterpark, the chapel building, the space museum, a site long planned for development of a hotel, and other vacant parcels in the vicinity of the campus, to the Utah-based event center company.
Although the space museum is being transferred, museum officials say they’re confident the new owner will be a “supportive and collaborative landlord,” and they stress it will operate as it has in the past.
“We’ll continue to remain as tenants on campus and the campus will be kept whole as a museum entity,” museum executive director Ann Witsil said last week. “We will not be changing, in fact we’ll be really ramping up our focus on the education component of the museum.”
Waterpark, wave pool
http://www.pamplinmedia.com/nbg/142-news/320723-200477-space-museum-waterpark-sold-for-109-million-

For information about other porperties available in the area, contact:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

1,800 unreinforced brick buildings need upgrades

Some of Portland's 1,800 unreinforced masonry buildings, which may not survive an earthquake. (Photo: City of Portland)
Considering buying a brick building? If so, proceed with your eyes wide open! Have a bricker in your current protfolio? Consider getting involved to help shape policy and incentives for seismic retrofitting

Proposed policy would require seismic retrofitting

An unprecendented increase in population. Alarmingly rising rents. The upcoming Cascadia Quake. In preparation for Portland’s predicted future, the city might place new, mandatory seismic upgrade requirements on brick buildings for safety that critics say would negatively affect the local economy. 
Basically, the policy requires old brick-and-mortar buildings to be seismically retrofitted — braced with steel to reduce the effects of liquefaction during a moderate ground quake. This covers most builds between 1870 to 1960.
http://pamplinmedia.com/but/239-news/323065-202050-proposed-policy-would-require-seismic-retrofitting

Unreinforced Masonry (URM) Seismic Retrofit Project

The URM Policy Committee is meeting monthly to prepare a seismic retrofit policy for Portland City Council to consider later this year.
Public forums are scheduled for the following dates:
September 8th: 6 to 8 p.m. at the Exchange Ballroom (123 NE 3rd Ave.)
September 22nd: 6 to 8 p.m. at the Portland Development Commission (222 NW 5th Ave.)
https://www.portlandoregon.gov/pbem/66306


For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Two properties added to Rockwood Rising Catalyst Site

FILE PHOTO - City of Gresham Urban Renewal Director Josh Fuhrer looks over the Rockwood Catalyst Site at the intersection of Southeast 187th Avenue and Stark Street.
Additional acres will be added to the Rockwood Catalyst Site, the former Fred Meyer store near the MAX line on Burnside. Although no plans are being made to change the current commercial/retail zoning, community input will be requested before the future development of the 2 sites are finalized.
What would you like to see?

Two More Acres Added to the NE of the Catalsyt Site

The acquisitions, which the Gresham Redevelopment Commission (GRDC) brought before the commission represent two acres to the northeast of the Catalyst Site — a former Fred Meyer store location — near the MAX light-rail station. One is at 18801 E. Burnside, currently leased to Asia Kitchen restaurant, and the other at 18901 E. Burnside St., which houses the Sunrise Center that is now leased to Rockwood Community Development Corporation (CDC).
 http://pamplinmedia.com/but/239-news/323043-202271-two-properties-added-to-rockwood-catalyst-site- 

For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Rockwood Rising phase one plans approved


COURTESY PHOTO - The Rockwood Rising design group created a model of what the site will look like upon completion of phase one. 
Rockwood is going to be a "ROCKEN" community! Let's make Rockwood the example of how a community re-devleopment project can successfully embrace the values of the exisiting cultures! Read below for the exciting plans that will re-shape the neighborhood's future.

Rockwood Rising- construction should begin in about a year.

Site will feature large public square, mixed-use buldings, market hall -

The Rockwood neighborhood has plenty of thrusters guiding it into the future. The Gresham Redevelopment Commission advisory committee recently voted to accept a proposed design from Brown’s firm, YBA Architects, for phase one of the new look of what will become Rockwood’s neighborhood center, situated at 185th Avenue between Southeast Burnsideand Southeast Stark streets.
The design is as ambitious as it is unique, using the resources and space available to create a layout that will draw the community together. 
They focused on using inviting materials and colors, and tried to keep as many sight lines from the roadways as possible into the interior of the site. 
“We want people to have a natural desire to walk across the space,” Brown said, “drawing the flow of people through and into the area.” 
The basic concept is a large public square, vibrant pedestrian streets, mixed-use buildings, parking spaces for visitors and a market hall that will serve as the crown jewel.
The market will be an iconic building that will become associated with the reclaimed idea of Rockwood as a neighborhood. 
The architecture design team was inspired by the idea of a lattice, invoking weaving together the diverse communities of people living all around the site. 
The color palette they want to follow plays off a literal reading of the neighborhood’s name, with Western Oregon basalt playing the part of rock and Douglas Fir as the wood. They also were stirred by a photo of the faces of Rockwood, again incorporating the diversity of the neighborhood. 
“We are going to have some of the most iconic buildings in East County right in the heart of Rockwood,” Albertson said. 
The designs call for office, residential and retail spaces. The square will have foliage and benches throughout, as well as a splash pad and play area for kids. The roadways will have limited access by cars, though the pedestrians will have complete right-of-way within the area. 
Using Torvehallerne Market in Copenhagen, Denmark, as a template, the design team envision the market with plenty of open spaces using an outer shell that in the summer can serve as a walkway and seating area. Within the market will be grocery stalls as well as small to medium-sized food vendors.
Read the complete article:
http://www.pamplinmedia.com/go/42-news/315164-193982-rockwood-rising-phase-one-plans-approved


For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Fighting fire with fire

OUTLOOK PHOTO: JOSH KULL - A KCR employee welds drip torch parts at the company's Wood Village factory.
KCR Manufacturing  is one business who knows how to capitalize on property tax abatements to grow in Wood Village's enterprise zone.  Read more in the newspaper article below. Maybe it's time to re-locate your business to the City of Wood Village!

New investment helps Wood Village equipment fabricator forge ahead -

With the help of a three-year property tax abatement through the Wood Village enterprise zone, KCR has invested about $450,000 in high-tech milling and lathe equipment to ramp up the company’s output. Holden, 50, is hopeful the hulking machines — a CNC five-axis mill and dual-spindle CNC lathe — will help employees make the company’s projected $1 million in sales this fiscal year a dependable baseline.

http://portlandtribune.com/go/42-news/314690-190295-fighting-fire-with-fire


For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 

Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Portland's Disappearing Affordable Bungalow


AP Photo/Don Ryan
Will expanding the urban growth boundary solve Portland's housing shortage? Do you know a developer who will build affordable housing without any financial reward?

“Nobody is going to build affordable housing out the goodness of their heart. They have never done it and they never will.”

Officials last year voted not to expand the region’s urban growth boundary. Combined with a hot housing market, homebuyers are being forced to adjust expectations.
According to McCurdy...
Almost half of Portland—45 percent—is zoned exclusively for single-family dwellings, she says, while only 10 percent is zoned for multi-family dwellings. It’s a stale reflection of the post-World War II world in which Portland’s zoning rules were drawn up.
“In the 1950s, two-thirds of our households were families. Today, two-thirds of our households [consist of] one and two people,” McCurdy says. “We’re aging and getting younger at both ends; we come from different backgrounds and cultures. We need to catch up our zoning with our families today and for the future.”

http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/08/portlands-disappearing-affordable-bungalow/494192/#disqus_thread


For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 

Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

3,500 Jobs Coming to Troutdale Reynods Industrial Park



Troutdale is poised to be the next East-side Hub for job creation. Undeveloped industrial properties are quickly going pending!

EPA: 3,500 jobs possible as Troutdale site is fully developed

August 16, 2016
The Port of Portland said Thursday a former Superfund site in Troutdale has the ability to provide enough room for 3,500 jobs when it's fully developed. 
As such, the 700-acre Troutdale Reynolds Industrial Park could generate $46 million each year in annual state and local taxes.

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/sbo/2016/08/epa-3-500-jobs-possible-as-troutdale-site-is-fully.html


Pending- · 4.88 Acres Rare Sandy River Frontage·

E Side/ NE Harlow Rd, Total List Price $882,000

Two tax lots combine for 4.88 Acres of rare Sandy River frontage. Light Industrial Zone allows many development possibilities; distribution center, warehouse, medical and dental clinics, limited retail, professional offices, winery, brewery, restaurant, hotel, convention center. River frontage with immediate access to Interstate 84, Troutdale Airport and the Country’s largest National Scenic Area affords a unique opportunity to capitalize on this strategic location as a destination development. Possibility to combine with adjacent property.


For more information about commercial property in the area, contact:
-- 
Karen Schaaf ACP, GRI
COMMERCIAL BROKER
RE/MAX equity group
Lackman Commercial Group
Licensed in Oregon